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December 5, 2012
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Max vs. Photoshop by bloknayrb Max vs. Photoshop by bloknayrb
A comparison of the same planet in Max and in Photoshop. I spent about 30 minutes on the Photoshop version, and about five hours on the 3D version.

That's what I get for being a n00b, I suppose. I need serious help.

Seriously, does anyone have any advice for me?
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:iconpriteeboy:
Both are great in regards to detail, I have seen one sin movies either on par or even not as good as these (mainly the right one) anyway ;p

First of all doing almost anything in 3D will take longer than painting/matte-painting the same in Photoshop, mainly because in a 3D software you need to consider the object (and its textures) from all sides in case you need to move it, or the camera around for a better composition. I would say doing anything in 3D is worthwhile if you plan on using it again later (to save time on a future piece, or even a commission, as 3D models have more re-use value than 2D images) or if you are doing an animation. Otherwise if it's just a once-off thing then good o'l Photoshop is the more practical choice time-wise :)

I won't crit the Photoshop one since that's obviously the one that you and I see as the "better" one that the other needs to live up to. For the 3D one I'd say the main issue is lighting. Light sources in 3Dprograms can still be much dimmer than a real life situation and often they need to be cranked up a lot. I know of some who use multiple lights just on a planet with one sun (which defies all logic, but for art's sake it may be necessary) usually with just one light forming a specular highlight (as you did in 2D form on the seas of the Photoshop one) :idea:
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:iconrmirandinha:
RMirandinha Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2013
Well i agree with priteeboy. I make most of my planets in 3d, and sometimes I use 2 or 3 different light sources do get a good looking planet. one for specular maps, another one for diffuse maps, and one very dim lightning on the dark side of the planet.

Hoevelkamp tutorials is a great resource, study them and develop your own technique .

In 3d, I use more the one cloud layer most of the times, with diferent sizes, its creates more depth, and on atmosphere I also use 2 layers, one for the typical inner and outer glow, and one to create a whole atmosphere all around the planet.
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:iconspydraxis01:
Spydraxis01 Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Alrighty bro, here's the deal: The reason you need more than one light is called "Ambient light" ambient light is that light which is reflected off of an object from the original source in 3d lighting is a real pain. so here's my advice as a 3d artist. Use no les than 3 lights 1: your main light and brightest source 2: a highlight which should be a pale color but about 30 percent dimmer than the main light and slightly askew from the main light 3: Reflected light set nearly opposite the main light and should be colored gray or gray-blue. (For space scenes anyway) if you have any specific light sources (Comets explosions etc.) they need to be taken into account too. Honestly 3d has more in common with photography so you constantly have to evaluate your lights.
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:iconbloknayrb:
bloknayrb Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yeah I've been working on lighting since I posted this [link] . I don't have a ton of experience with studio photography, but as I get more comfortable with the lights in Max I should start getting better results. There's a lot to learn.
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:iconspydraxis01:
Spydraxis01 Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Here's tutorial that really changed the way I do things and saved me boatloads of render time. In fact my average render time is well under 5 minutes thanks to this guy. He does allot of stuff for Daz3d professionally so I took his advice to heart I just wish I had the cash for his workshops so I could get more out of him LOL In truth it's not as complicated as it seems if you have a good eye, and you do.

[link]
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:iconbloknayrb:
bloknayrb Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Interesting. I don't have the time/money for something like that at the moment, but I'll keep it bookmarked. Thanks!
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:iconspydraxis01:
Spydraxis01 Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Honestly I took the freebie and ran with it LOL
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:iconinnerclick:
Innerclick Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
Max vs. Photoshop,I would change the Resolution to 300 and the color mode to RGB 8bit. This has helped me out threw out the years in both but I use Adobe illustrator with filters. In Photoshop click on the earth and at the same time press the CTRL on your keyboard and change the angle of the earth copy do it gain. but what do I know.
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:iconbloknayrb:
bloknayrb Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I'm not sure I understand what you're suggesting here. The image is intended to show the difference in results based on different amounts of effort in two programs in which I have vastly different amounts of experience.
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:iconhoevelkamp:
hoevelkamp Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2012   Digital Artist
Hey Bryan,

:D Off to a good start I see... Seriously. Try excluding the atmosphere from shadow casting and increase the strength of the lightsource a bit. That should bring out the texture of the actual planet a bit better. To get the reflection the light for the planet and the light for the reflection don't have to be in the same place, you can cheat as much as you want. ;)
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:iconbloknayrb:
bloknayrb Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I also need to start making much higher-res textures. 3D is not nearly as forgiving as Photoshop is. Your tutorials are helpful but are aimed at a more experienced Max user, I think. Half of my problems were just finding tools in Max and figuring out the material editor.
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